While it is harder to push, and a wee bit heavier, it is easier to use overall and earned a higher score for quality than the competitors in our umbrella review. The Yoyo+ is more expensive than similar products so it isn't the best option for families on a budget or parents who only need a travel stroller for a single event. Should you want a less expensive second product for travel or grandma's house, the ZOE XL1 BEST v2 has a similar style and features for a significantly lower price. If budget isn't a concern, and you want the absolute best in a lightweight product, the BabyZen Yoyo+ is a standout.
The cost of all those adapters and accessories adds up. Getting the stroller, the RumbleSeat, and both adapters costs about $1,115, and it’s $120 more for the riding board. And while the attractive, well-made bassinet is certified for overnight use, you can use it for only a few months, until the baby can push up on their hands and knees or reaches 20 pounds or 25 inches long. Uppababy does make a stand for the bassinet, which is—naturally—sold separately. Some parents who made a different choice for their first child and are now planning to use the Vista as a double from the start may wish that it simply came with two seats, instead of one seat and a bassinet. It also doesn’t come with a cup holder, a parent organizer, or a child snack tray for either seat, though you can buy each separately.
If you’re checking your stroller on a plane trip, it will take a lot of abuse from baggage handling, so do remember to remove those cup holders and other accessories that can easily fall or break off (I have lost two cup holders this way – gah!). Also, remember to tag your stroller (and your car seat, for that matter) at the desk beforehand so you don’t hold up the line while boarding.
This stroller has an awesomely quick one-step fold, much like that of its single sibling. To collapse it, you just grab the straps in the middle of the seats with both hands and pull up. It folds quite flat and locks automatically in that position, and we found that it could stand on its own when folded if the wheels were facing the right way. Its folded dimensions are 31.89 by 30.12 by 9.84 inches (height by width by depth), and in our tests it fit in both an SUV trunk with lots of room to spare and a compact hatchback with space for other bags and gear. It was also the easiest model to assemble of all the strollers we tested, taking only four minutes.
Safety is a must. Be sure the stroller frame is sturdy and locks into place with an audible click to avoid an accidental tumble. A five-point harness is standard on most strollers, other than umbrella strollers. Brakes should lock and unlock easily. Choose a stroller that is certified by the JPMA, which means the model meets a wide range of safety guidelines.

The Baby Trend Expedition Double is a budget-friendly option for two that you can occasionally jog with. This double product is a good option for anyone looking for the jogger look and feel, without the price tag that comes with a more traditional jogger. The Expedition Double sports pneumatic rubber wheels that work well on a variety of terrains, and a locking swivel front wheel that makes it suitable for jogging. Even if you don't jog, the features make it one of the better choices for moving over uneven terrains like grass and gravel. With identical seating, including stow pockets and canopy, and a useful parent's tray and under seat storage, this inexpensive product has features that make daily use easy and convenient, which helped it win an award for Best Value in our Double Strollers Review.
When open, the gb Pockit is actually a nice umbrella stroller, but when compared to standard strollers the features just don't add up—the storage capacity is minimal, the sun shade isn't a full-size canopy, and the wheels are tiny—but these are par for the course with umbrella strollers. It might work for people with very particular needs, but for most people this just won't hold up as a primary option.

While Graco redefined the market more than a decade ago with their Nautilus combination seat, it was always far too heavy and bulky to be a good travel booster seat or travel combination seat. They’ve now upped the ante with a new offering that’s vying for the best travel combination seat title – the Graco Tranzitions and Graco Wayz seats. These three-mode harnessed booster seats for travel are narrower, cheaper and lighter than the Nautilus! There’s certainly a lot to like. Check the latest reviews and prices here.
In addition to testing this stroller for this guide, I actually have owned it (and a previous model) or several years. It's easy to push, has just enough space to hold all our gear for a full day, and my wife can easily hold our daughter in one arm while folding the stroller and putting it in her car with the other. We're not alone in loving it, either: user reviews are exceptionally strong, with over 80 percent (!!) five-star reviews on Amazon.
While Graco redefined the market more than a decade ago with their Nautilus combination seat, it was always far too heavy and bulky to be a good travel booster seat or travel combination seat. They’ve now upped the ante with a new offering that’s vying for the best travel combination seat title – the Graco Tranzitions and Graco Wayz seats. These three-mode harnessed booster seats for travel are narrower, cheaper and lighter than the Nautilus! There’s certainly a lot to like. Check the latest reviews and prices here.
While Graco redefined the market more than a decade ago with their Nautilus combination seat, it was always far too heavy and bulky to be a good travel booster seat or travel combination seat. They’ve now upped the ante with a new offering that’s vying for the best travel combination seat title – the Graco Tranzitions and Graco Wayz seats. These three-mode harnessed booster seats for travel are narrower, cheaper and lighter than the Nautilus! There’s certainly a lot to like. Check the latest reviews and prices here.
The most popular configurations are side by side and in line, explained in more detail below. However, double strollers are also available in the light, manoeuvrable umbrella style, which sports a light shade on top for sun or rain protection. A heavy duty version, the jogging stroller, is designed to tackle rougher terrain. The sit-and-stand stroller offers flexibility, with either one child standing, or both kids seated and buckled. Learn more about strollers and purchasing tips with our stroller buying guide.
While Graco redefined the market more than a decade ago with their Nautilus combination seat, it was always far too heavy and bulky to be a good travel booster seat or travel combination seat. They’ve now upped the ante with a new offering that’s vying for the best travel combination seat title – the Graco Tranzitions and Graco Wayz seats. These three-mode harnessed booster seats for travel are narrower, cheaper and lighter than the Nautilus! There’s certainly a lot to like. Check the latest reviews and prices here.
The B-Safe 35 is a fairly popular seat and scored 8.8 in our infant car seat ratings. It has two layers of side impact protection, a steel frame, and impact absorbing base. The B-Lively stroller (like other 3-wheeled models) is technically a 4-wheeled stroller, since two wheels act as the third front wheel. The swivel front double wheel adds to the stability when taking sharp turns through narrow places.

Ultimately, it's hard to find real faults with the City Mini. I've owned mine for years now, and it's still holding up great. It's worked perfectly with my daughter from the time she was 7 months old through to today, and it still looks like new after a good cleaning. Though we have two kids and own a bulkier double stroller for long walks with both kids, we opt for the City Mini any time that we can get away with it. It's just that good.


The City Mini Double comes in four colors: black, green, red, and blue. Its frame has a lifetime warranty, while the other parts have a one-year warranty. We tested the latest version, the 2016 model, which has a longer handlebar, changes to the spacing between the wheels, a Velcro closure for the seat vent, and an improved fold and auto lock compared with the company’s previous model. The City Mini Double is the only stroller among our picks whose fabric you can easily remove and machine wash.
Unfortunately, the Expedition Double lacks tracking and suspension, so you won't want to run with it regularly, but the ability to take it on a quick run makes it a more versatile option compared to traditional double options. It is also bulky and heavy compared to lightweight options so it isn't good for travel. However, if you want a double with rubber tires and a three-wheel design for slick maneuverability, then this economical option is one to go for.
One of the biggest advantages that this stroller car seat combo has over other models is that it offers something for children who may be too big to sit comfortably in a regular stroller seat - a jump seat or standing platform. It still has the options of two regular stroller seats or two car seats. A covered parent tray with two cup holders and extra large storage basket keep all your essentials at hand.
In just a few short months, your baby will be sitting up on her own and ready to ride in her stroller without the car seat. Since the usual stroller should last until your child is 50 or more pounds, you’ll want one with good suspension and easy maneuverability. A sleeping 3-year-old can often feel like they weigh a ton, so you want something you can push around easily without breaking your back and waking her up. The stroller should also be easy for your toddler to climb in and out of without having to be picked up.
A family vacation—whether a road trip to grandma’s house or overseas to a bucket-list destination—is one of life’s great joys. It just takes planning ahead and having a few pieces of kid gear that make life on the road easier. A stroller that acts like a rolling home base (sitting-napping-diaper-changing spot) is an essential for trips with younger tots.
The BravoFor2 is one of the easiest to fold, and the simplest to carry, of all the strollers we tested. It has a designated bar that is comfortable to grip and hold, and its compact fold (15 by 23.25 by 35 inches, length by width by height) is not awkward to lift, unlike that of most double strollers. At 26.5 pounds, it isn’t the lightest stroller we tested, but it is as much as 10 pounds lighter than the heaviest strollers we tried—and about the same weight as our upgrade pick in single configuration. It can stand on its own when folded.
The materials Chicco uses in this stroller don’t feel as great as those of some of the more expensive strollers we tested, and the canopy’s small peekaboo window doesn’t give you a great view of the baby. The BravoFor2 does come with a parent console that includes a nice zippered pocket, but the two cup holders are so shallow that they’re best suited for use with spillproof vessels. This stroller also doesn’t include any of the extras that some of the most expensive models have, such as an adjustable handlebar or a hand brake. It has no shade for the big kid either.
You might also want to check if the stroller with car seat combo that you are about to purchase is right for your lifestyle. If you constantly travel, go for a model that is lightweight. However, if you are fond of running or jogging, you might be better off with a jogger or all-terrain stroller. Strollers with four wheels provide better stability but three-wheeled ones are easier to maneuver around narrow hallways and tight spaces. In the end, choose a model that will make things more comfortable and easier for you.
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